Author Archives: Yami

How To Declutter Your Home Without Getting Overwhelmed

Living a minimalist life has many benefits such as having less to clean and spending more time with the items you truly cherish, but even just decluttering your home and life a little can reduce stress. Most people get hung up in the process, however, and either do not know where to start or get overwhelmed at the scope of the project.

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Hire Domestic Staff

A big stumbling block for families and individuals looking to declutter their home is getting distracted by the mess that you clean instead. Hiring a housekeeper or a cleaning service to come in once or twice a week can curb this and you can find qualified staff through a domestic agency Beverly Hills CA to help you meet your decluttering goals, even if they just keep other distractions away from your project.

Start With Hidden Stuff

Most of the clutter you see on your countertops and shelves is stuff that you use every day, it is just there because better storage and organization options are full with the things that you do not use. So, when decluttering, start with the places where you want to keep everyday items. For instance, if you have paperwork clutter on your desk, start by shredding outdated and unnecessary documents in your filing cabinets.

Make It Routine

You do not have to spend a week straight tackling every nook and cranny of your home to declutter, even five minutes a day can add up without adding stress. There are many methods for decluttering which can be turned into a routine. For instance, you can ask your housekeeper to help you declutter one area for a couple of minutes each time they arrive and be amazed at the progress made.

Decluttering your home without becoming overwhelmed is all about how you break the job down. When you have help cleaning or watching the kids, start with hidden clutter and build a routine, you will see five minutes a day add up to a more tidy and functional space to relax in.

The Financial Aspects of Divorce When Children Are Involved

Ending a marriage is particularly hard when you have children. It is such an emotional time, yet you need to think clearly and rationally as you make financial decisions.

Your child custody attorney Boise ID can assist you with your parenting plan, which includes money matters. Here are some child-related financial issues you are likely to encounter in your divorce proceedings.

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Child Support

The court will determine the amount of child support the custodial parent receives. Each situation is unique, but the amount is typically calculated according to established state guidelines. In Idaho, payments may be made in several different ways: through an employer, online, by check or over the phone.

Shared Expenses

Child support will not cover all of the expenses associated with raising your children. Educational expenditures, extracurricular activities and medical expenses not covered by insurance can add up. Such costs are generally split by parents, and your divorce agreement should identify how payments will be made. Expense tracking apps can help parents record expenses; mobile payment services allow parties to transfer money with little interaction.

Be sure to agree on expenses ahead of time. No one likes to be blindsided by a bill or have to make continuous demands for money. Be precise in your divorce agreement and you may avoid undue conflict in the years to come.

Health Insurance

Most divorce agreements state which parent should provide health insurance for the children. If both parents have access to health coverage, you may choose the most comprehensive or most affordable plan.

Taxes

The IRS only allows one parent to claim each child, so you and your spouse should decide ahead of time who will claim the children as dependents. Your decision can affect who files as head of household, who claims the dependent care credit and who qualifies for the earned income tax credit.

You make many tough choices during divorce proceedings. Be especially careful when making financial decisions — they can affect your children’s lives for years to come.

5 Questions About Posting Bail for a Loved One

When your friend or family member is facing jail time, you may also be facing a new and stressful situation. If you haven’t considered it before, you may wonder whether you’re willing to help pay the bail amount. It’s reasonable to want to know more about the situation before turning over any of your cash or property.

1. How much will it cost?

Your costs are determined by the amount of bail. Many bail bond companies charge a percentage of the bail price and may also charge a fee. If your percentage of the cost is too high for you to pay immediately, some agencies allow you to make payments toward your share. They may also require something as collateral, such as a vehicle or a property deed.

2. What does it mean to be a co-signer?

When you co-sign for your friend or family member, you are accepting the responsibility to pay the bail money and to make sure your loved one attends all required court dates. This is a lot of responsibility so carefully consider your risks before accepting them.

3. How can I decide whether to become a co-signer?

Judges consider several factors before offering bail and setting a bail amount. You should also consider these factors. Does your loved one have a criminal history? How serious are the charges? Are there patterns of drug or alcohol abuse? How sure are you that your friend or family member will attend all court dates? Remember that you won’t get your money or property back if your loved one doesn’t comply fully with the judge’s orders.

4. How soon will my loved one be released?

After you’ve completed the paperwork with the pennsylvania bail bonds agency, it may be only a few hours before your loved one gets out. This can be affected by the workload of the agency and the jail. It’s important to remember that release times may also vary by county.

5. What happens if I don’t post bail?

If you don’t post bail, your loved one will remain in jail or be moved to a detention center. He or she will remain in custody until the case is resolved. All of this time in custody will be considered part of time served when sentencing is complete.