Category Archives: Safety tips

Anti-scam Tips from the Philippine National Police

Illustration by NVT for People’s Tonight, People’s Journal

IN a country where texting, browsing the web and engaging in online chats are common day-to-day activities, here are more Philippine National Police tips on how to detect scams and what an individual should do in case he or she encounters one this summer time.

According to the PNP leadership headed by Director General Ronald ‘Bato’ M. dela Rosa, the safety tips were designed to prepare and equip the public with the necessary information needed to counter the ever-growing threats posed by scammers including those involved in cyber-terrorism and other online frauds.

PNP spokesman, Chief Superintendent Dionardo B. Carlos encouraged the citizenry to thoroughly consider the following safety tips since everybody needs to develop his or her own safety core competency needed to help save precious lives and properties.

The Nigerian inheritance/legacy scam — The consumer is contacted, usually by email by an individual claiming to be either a representative of the Nigerian government, a wealthy business person or the widow of a deposed African leader. The trickster may claim that they have discovered a bank account belonging to a deceased citizen or has come into possession of a large sum of money. The trickster offers to share the proceeds if the consumer allows him/her to deposit the money into their bank account. The consumer is asked to provide their account details and other sensitive information. However, before the transaction takes place, an ‘unforeseen difficulty’ occurs and additional fees from the victim are ‘necessary to overcome the problem.’

What to do:

1. Do not overreact.

2. Always find a way to verify or validate the call or messages.

3. Do not give any information.

4. On unscrupulous text messages, do not waste your load. Let them run out of load. Do not text back. Ignore their messages.

5. Do not give out personal information that can be exploited like your full name, email address, mobile number, place and date of birth most especially your SSS number, credit card number, bank account details, etc. They are fishing for you to tell them of your financial information.

6. If you have given up your formation already, contact your financial institution/bank at once. You likely will have to close your account immediately.

7. Report it to any or all of the following: Anti-Money Laundering Council Secretariat, 5/F EDPC Building, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Complex, Manila, Tel. 302-3982 and 524-7011 local 2372 and; Anti-Fraud and Computer Crimes Division, National Bureau of Investigation, Taft Avenue, Manila, Tel. 532-8231 local 3455/3456 or emai
l at http://www.nbi.gov.ph/.

Foreign exchange scam — The group/individual approaches and convinces their would-be victim into exchanging their foreign currencies into pesos at a rate higher than the prevailing exchange rates.

During the transaction which actually takes place outside or right in front of a foreign exchange shop, the equivalent pesos are counted before the victim three times.

Initially, the victim is allowed to count the money he will receive to make him feel confident that he will get the exact amount for his foreign currency. After that, a recount is done by one of the perpetrators who spread the pesos in his palm to cover his fingers that are folding a portion of the bunch. At the same time, the suspect distracts the attention of the victim, often by telling him to be extra careful of robbers while wrapping the bundle of money in a newspaper or placing it inside a paper bag.

The victim eventually discovers that he was short-changed when he counts the money while inside a car or upon arrival at his house or hotel.

What to do: Avoid foreign exchange trades outside legitimate establishments. Stay away from people transacting or following you that offer tempting deals and report to the nearest authority or police station.

The PNP also warned against the presence of local and international syndicates engaged in cyber extortion or more commonly known as ‘sextortion.’ The Interpol recently lauded the PNP for its series of accomplishments against local and international syndicates engaged in all forms of cybercrimes specifically cyber-terrorism.

Dozens of suspected ‘sextortionists’ have been arrested by agents of the PNP Anti-Cybercrime Group, three of them accused three years ago of victimizing a teenager from UK who later killed himself after he was threatened by the syndicate they will upload his recorded cybersex act if he will fail to deposit money to their given account.

“Be cautious about people you meet online. Revealing personal details online is extremely risky and may not be who they seem to be, because there are lots of fake accounts online,” he said in warning the public in the wake of the series of police anti-sextortion raids.

According to Carlos, “scammers often seek soft targets so they move on if you do not respond.” “Just block their e-mails and their accounts and cease all contacts with the scammer. If ever you encounter this kind of scam, save the scammer’s details, e-mails, comment threads, or any other evidence you have of them and the extortion attempt,” he added.

The PNP has a strict policy against paying scammers and extortionist. He said that persons being victimized by scammers can contact the PNP-ACG hotline 414-1560 or e-mail complaints at acg.pnp.gov.ph for immediate assistance 24/7. Persons victimized by these con artists may call or go to the nearest police station to file their complaint or dial DILG Patrol 117 or Text PNP 2920.

Credit:  http://journal.com.ph/

Fire Prevention Month 2017

Illustration credit: NT and People’s Tonight Editorial for its March 2, 2017 issue

March is the start of summer season in the Philippines. And while we look forward to summer activities we must not forget March is also Fire Prevention Month. According to the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP) the biggest number of fire incidents are usually recorded on said month.

This year’s Fire Prevention Month theme, “Buhay at Ari-arian ay Pahalagahan, Ibayong Pag-iingat sa Sunog ay sa Sariling Pamamahay Simulan,” reflects the BFP’s commitment to raise public awareness about the importance of fire prevention.

For his part, Senator Richard Gordon who also serves as Chairman and CEO of the Philippine Red Cross said, prevention is key when it comes to fire safety. “But it’s also smart to make sure that all members of your household know what to do in case there’s a fire emergency.”

The Philippine Red Cross recommends the following tips on how to reduce risks in case of fire:

  • Make sure every member of the household knows where the fire escape is.
  • Agree on a meeting place at a safe distance from the home.
  • Teach everyone at home how to use a fire extinguisher.
  • If smoke, heat, or flames are blocking your exit route, stay in the room with the door closed.
  • If you can, move close to a window and wave something bright (a flashlight, glow stick,or a brightly colored cloth) to signal for help.
  • Once you are out, stay out.
  • If you haven’t already called the fire department, call them once you make it to safety.

Meanwhile, PRC Secretary General Oscar P. Palabyab said fire is preventable. “But it pays to be aware of fire survival tips, especially during the summer, when most fire incidents unfortunately occur.”

Source: Philippine Red Cross

Simple Ways to Promote a Safer Work Environment

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Despite many advances in technology, accidents can and will happen on the factory floor. Although it’s practically inevitable, there are some steps that can be done to both reduce the occurrence of accidents, and to hopefully mitigate most of their potential for damage as well. With that in mind, this guide will offer a few tips that any manager can undertake to promote a safer work environment and ensure that their company is insulated from any potential lawsuits.

Stay Updated

One of the most important ways for a factory to stay safe, or any business for that matter, is to always be investing in new technologies that can remove much of the work’s burden on humans. For example, industrial mixers, such as those built by Aim Blending, can ensure that chemicals and waste are properly handled. This prevents workers from taking the unnecessary risk upon themselves, and can potentially keep the entire area safer as a result.

Adopt Efficient Management Techniques

There has been a considerable amount of research conducted on the difference between a manager and a leader. While some people try to imagine themselves as a leader, the truth is that more people need to recognize their role as a manager instead. Leaders are really only concerned with results, and tend to view people as a means to an end. By contrast, managers should be concerned with each person as an individual, and look for opportunities to help them be comfortable in their work environment. With that in mind, try to adopt a management style that takes this into account. The more attuned you are to the needs of your workers, the less likely something unexpected will happen to them on your watch.

Develop a Cohesive Safety Program

Safety manuals can typically be filled with a lot of information. Even if most of it is useful though, odds are good that people will ignore it or disregard it the first chance they get. Even with an effective manager, it can be difficult for people to simply keep up with all of the protocols and bureaucratic steps involved with a process. In order to make things easier to remember, the first step is to roll everything into a single and cohesive program that is easy to remember. In doing so, you’ll ensure that people are more likely to actually pay attention to it and not take it for granted.

While these steps may not completely remove any accidents from your factory or work environment, they can at least make it feel safer. By treating people well, and investing the proper technologies, you can make your place of business somewhere that workers actually want to go, rather than dread.