The Impact of the First Step Act

Those who have been arrested on drug charges and are awaiting their day in court have a bit of hope for their future. It’s more than just the opportunity to use the bonding company Yadkin NC services to get released on bail. It’s the effect that the First Step Act will on mandatory minimum sentencing practices.

The Ways of the Past

Many have complained about the inconsistencies of criminal sentencing, especially in nonviolent and first offense cases. There are over two million people incarcerated across the United States, with many serving harsh sentences for crimes wouldn’t have thought to carry so much weight. The demands of funding on the prison system are draining to the taxpayer, and the labor requirements are overworking already underpaid staff. Long sentences, limited resources, and personnel challenges complicate an already complex justice system.

The Future Hope

Through the passing of the First Step Act, there is new funding and new guidance for prison reform. It starts with reassessing the sentencing practiced for nonviolent drug offenses, but it will also influence the creation of in-prison programming to reduce recidivism. Drug treatment, vocational training, and education are just a few of the opportunities that can help those who are incarcerated actually change their life and have for a post-prison future. Some programs allow inmates to work toward early release or a transfer to prerelease custody.

The Present Help

According to Justice Department officials, more than 3,100 people were eligible for immediate release from federal prisons all over the nation because of the First Step Act. The act provided an increase in the number of days that could be earned toward early release, and the prison system is reporting that up to 85% of people in federal prison will benefit from the change.

Prison reform has been an issue for years, but with the First Step Act, progress has been made. The efforts of activists, politicians, and nonprofits can continue to address the concerns of the American justice system.

Protecting Yourself from Covid-19 at Work

The Covid-19 pandemic has literally changed the world. In a matter of months, its spread has devastated the U.S. economy, infected millions, and cost a frightening number of lives. If you have remained at your workplace, or will be returning soon, a few simple precautions can drastically reduce your exposure and chances of infection.

Photo by Tai’s Captures on Unsplash

Face Masks

Perhaps the most elementary and effective piece of personal protection equipment Washington in the fight against Covid-19 is a simple face mask. Medical professionals and frontline healthcare workers can and should use the most powerful form of surgical mask, the N95. For people in situations with an average level of risk, however, a disposable or cloth mask is remarkably effective at preventing transmission both to and from your nose and mouth.

Eye Wear

Our eyes are susceptible to airborne germs as they are both orifices and contain liquid. Wraparound goggles can do a nice job of sealing in your eyes, and many are designed with anti-fog technology, so you can see properly when wearing them in conjunction with a mask. Face shields can help prevent ocular transmissions, but it is critical that a mask is worn with them. They cover the eyes, but do not provide an effective seal around the mouth and nose.

A Note About Gloves

Many people think that latex surgical gloves are an important tool to fight Covid-19. Something very crucial must be understood about them: gloves do not kill the disease, and if you are touching multiple surfaces, you may actually cross-contaminate and spread Covid-19 if one of them is infected. Unless you are a medical professional who touches others, focus on handwashing, and leave the gloves at home.

It will take diligence from all of us to defeat Covid-19. Thankfully, these steps are simple and inexpensive. Make them a part of your day-to-day public life, and we’ll all be a little closer to returning to normalcy.

Questions to Discuss Before Marriage

Marriage is a big commitment to enter into. You’re giving your life to someone else and promising to be there for that person forever. It can be scary, especially with the high rates of divorce, but being realistic about things can help ensure you have a strong relationship. Here are a few things you should discuss prior to walking down the aisle. 

Will You Have Kids?

Although you don’t necessarily need to plan out how many you’ll have and when you’ll have them, it’s a good idea to know whether your partner wants children at all. If you are going to have kids, you may want to think about going to a Jacksonville family law firm and having a will drawn up. You’ll want to decide who will raise them if anything happens to you and your spouse. 

Where Will You Live?

Are you planning on finding a new place together, or are you going to move into one of your current homes? You may also want to talk about where you want to settle down. What would you do if one of you got a big job promotion, but it required you to move to another state?

Who Handles the Money?

You should talk about whether you plan to have separate accounts or joint accounts. Figure out who is going to pay the bills and do your taxes. You may also want to go ahead and sit down a make a budget together.

It may seem easier to ignore these big decisions and just enjoy the bliss of the engagement phase, but putting these discussions off until after the wedding can end up being disastrous. If you aren’t sure how to approach these topics, consider attending premarital counseling. After all, it’s best to know what you’re getting into before you take the big leap.