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Rainmakers: The men behind the jingles

I had a little chat with the members of the Rainmakers sometime in March 2001 for an election-related assignment. The group, who popularized the ballad “Binibini” in the 70’s, was active in doing (writing and performing) political campaign jingles then.

“While the time is not right for making a comeback, there should be something to keep busy at,” Luke said in an interview.

“Were more open to jingle making because there are more demand to this, mas madalas kasi ang kinukuha ngayon to do shows are the new ones.”

The Rainmakers. From left, Joel Macanaya, Luke Gaston, *Courier reporter, Joseph Lansang. Mon Villanueva was not present during the interview. Picture taken at their studio.

The Rainmakers is the voice and brains behind the campaign jingles of several known politicians including that of showbiz couple (former Senator) Bong Revilla and (Mayor) Lani Mercado.

Here’s the excerpts of our chat:

Courier: Does it always follow that jingles should suit the personality of candidate?

Luke Gaston: Sa lyrics, andoon na dapat ang power points.

For example, iniisip ko gawan ng jingle si Senator Juan Flavier (former DOH Secretary). It would a comedy approach, the tune would be something funny and witty, like the ditty “Pop Goes the Weasel.” It’s funny but it does not necessarily mean that there is no power point. Ang maganda ay ‘yung dumidikit sa mind ng masa.

One example is Loren’s (Senator Legarda) campaign jingle, which goes “Loren, Loren, sinta, instead of “leron, leron, sinta.” Very simple, very elementary.

If if would be for (Senator) Enrile, dapat medyo dignified.

Courier: How important are jingles to candidates?

Joel Macanaya: You have to capture everything in 30 seconds, you have to convey a message in 30 seconds.

In political jingle, we do one adaptation and one original song for the client. The original song or jingle should stick and identify with the candidate.

You have the power point, you have the good lyrics, you have the good things to say, but would it stick to the mind of the listener.

I think we are successful in terms of conveying what our clients want to express through our songs.

Many of our clients have won the election. The secret, maybe, is effectiveness.

The jingles, we suggest should be fast or with a little marching tune. People should be able to know the lyrics of the song and easy to memorize.

A simple campaign jingle in the early 2000 costs P75,000 for 30 seconds. If it is adaptation P45,000. For a full-length song, P100,000 to P150,000.

*I have worked with Courier, the Philippine Journalists Incorporated flagship newspaper in 2000. This article was published in March 3, 2001.